Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Assignment #17

Obama Wins in Mississippi

Senator Barack Obama won Mississippi’s Democratic presidential primary on Tuesday, building his delegate lead over Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton in the final contest before the nominating fight heads to Pennsylvania for a six-week showdown.

Mr. Obama’s victory was built on a wave of support among blacks, who made up half of those who turned out to vote, according to exit polls conducted by television networks and The Associated Press. The polls found that roughly 90 percent of black voters supported Mr. Obama, but only a third of white voters did.

“It’s just another win in our column, and we are getting more delegates,” Mr. Obama, of Illinois, said. “I am grateful to the people of Mississippi for the wonderful support. What we’ve tried to do is steadily make sure that in each state we are making the case about the need for change in this country.”

Senator John McCain, the Republican nominee, won the primary for his party, taking him closer to the number of delegates needed to clinch the nomination.

After a frenzied string of primaries and caucuses for more than two months, Mississippi was alone in holding its contest Tuesday, where 33 delegates were at stake. It was the last primary before a six-week interlude. The Pennsylvania primary on April 22 opens the final stage of the Democratic nominating fight, with eight states, Puerto Rico and Guam left to weigh in.

Mississippi offered Mr. Obama an opportunity to regain his footing after losing the popular vote to Mrs. Clinton last week in three contests, Ohio, Texas and Rhode Island. Mr. Obama had been expected to win resoundingly in Mississippi, a state where 36 percent of the population is black, the highest percentage in the nation. He has enjoyed strong support among black voters and won all the other contests in the Deep South by large margins.

While Mrs. Clinton, of New York, campaigned in Mississippi last week and former President Bill Clinton dropped in over the weekend, the Clinton campaign has mostly been looking ahead to Pennsylvania, with its 158 delegates at stake.

Mrs. Clinton was campaigning in Pennsylvania on Tuesday when Mr. Obama began the day with a final appeal for support in the Mississippi Delta.

In the final days of the primary race, Mrs. Clinton raised the idea that Democrats struggling to decide between the candidates could have it both ways, implying that Mr. Obama would make a suitable running mate.

Mr. Obama rejected that idea on Monday as he campaigned in Mississippi, telling voters, “With all due respect, I’ve won twice as many states as Senator Clinton.”

As in many other states, an overwhelming share of voters said they were looking for change and were worried about the economy. Mr. Obama won the support of voters who listed those as their chief concerns, according to the surveys of voters.

Mississippi Democrats were twice as likely to say Mr. Obama inspired them about their future as opposed to Mrs. Clinton. Mr. Obama was more than twice as likely to be seen as honest.

(I don't know how much you know about the election in the States now, but I thought you might like a challenge)
Questions:
1.) What do you know or have you heard about Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama?
2.) Who do you think would help improve the US's image around the world?
3.) Do you think a woman or a member of a minority group will ever become president of Taiwan?

For the real article, see the NY Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/12/us/politics/12mississippi.html?_r=1&ref=politics&oref=slogin

2 comments:

samson said...

I didn't know much about Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama because I am tired of watching these kind of political news.

I think it is possible that a woman or a member of a minority group to become president of Taiwan. Taiwanese are having progress on these kinds of perspective and we already have an female vice-president

William said...

I agree with you, Samson